About

hello! i'm nicole, a science illustration student living by the sea. this blog will document my learning curve.

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i am currently available for freelance. you can view my official portfolio at nicolemwong.com

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the latest issue of Encircl is out! the challenge this time was to write a story containing 100 words or less on the topic of “Abundance.” the articles will be rolling out steadily over the next couple months, so check back on the site for updates. i made this quick illustration to accompany Omar’s piece, “St. John’s Wort.” Read it here.
Additional notes on the flower:
-Latin name: Hypericum perforatum
-its use as a medicine dates back to ancient Greece. in recent years, it has been studied extensively as a treatment for depression
-the plant gets its name from being in full bloom around June 24, the traditionally celebrated birthday of John the Baptist
(source)

the latest issue of Encircl is out! the challenge this time was to write a story containing 100 words or less on the topic of “Abundance.” the articles will be rolling out steadily over the next couple months, so check back on the site for updates. i made this quick illustration to accompany Omar’s piece, “St. John’s Wort.” Read it here.

Additional notes on the flower:

-Latin name: Hypericum perforatum

-its use as a medicine dates back to ancient Greece. in recent years, it has been studied extensively as a treatment for depression

-the plant gets its name from being in full bloom around June 24, the traditionally celebrated birthday of John the Baptist

(source)

as some of you may know, one of my day jobs is working as an assistant to the artist Louise Despont, so i’m super proud of her show that opened recently at the Pioneer Works gallery in Red Hook, Brooklyn! for this collection, she was inspired by the architecture of beehives. there will be an accompanying lecture series at the gallery that revolves around this theme.

first up: a talk about the life of the honey bee, with beekeeper Bill Day of the Pfeiffer Center. it takes place tomorrow, Thursday, June 26, 7pm. 

from the website: 

"How do tens of thousands of bees decide where to forage for nectar (and make “varietal” honeys), when to create a new queen, or swarm? In the course of their lives, worker bees perform a dozen different functions within and outside of the hive; how does the colony, with no central management, direct individual bees to fulfill its needs at any given time? What force or wisdom guides the bees in building comb, a vast collaboration that draws resources from the entire hive? Why do bees build six-sided cells to store their honey and raise their brood? 

This talk will examine the beehive as an organism and as a social ideal. Along the way we will look at the connections between modern agriculture and the perilous condition of the honey bee today, and discuss how alternative ways of agriculture and beekeeping can secure the bees’ future – and our own. 

There will be ample time for questions and discussion.”

(click here for more details

also check out this mini-doc feature of Louise the folks at ART21: New York Close Up filmed at her studio! you’ll even see my mug for a few seconds. the filmmakers were incredibly gracious, and it was fun to see their process. it’s definitely an art form on its own. at one point they had tiny cameras taped to our compasses, pencils, and rulers— to get an art supply-eye’s view of making a drawing. take a look:


The Atlas of World Wildlife by Martyn Bramwell (Editor), Sir Julian Huxley (Foreword) 

my favorite book from the birthday booty C gave me. it’s chock-full of art and science diagrams, and i’m sure it will take my whole life to digest it all, but i am in love with every single one of its spreads and have no qualms about taking it in slowly. this will be my go-to inspiration reference for future illustrations, no doubt about it. 

i recently, reluctantly, celebrated another birthday. after brunch with H, we hit the Paul Kasmin Gallery in Chelsea to see the latest Walton Ford exhibit. there we encountered magnificent animals in various stages of rage, greed, drunkenness, and malaise— exactly what i needed. 

if you’re in the New York City area, do yourself a favor and go! (you have until the 21st): 293 Tenth Ave, New York, NY

it’s close enough to the end of the month, so here’s a preview of some illustrations i completed for Bay Nature magazine, the April-June 2014 issue. they accompany an article about a man who climbs and camps out in trees all around San Francisco, his personal way of reconnecting with nature in the midst of city life. fans of Richard Preston’s, The Wild Trees are in for a treat! many thanks to David Loeb for the opportunity to work on this assignment.